Saturday, 18 May 2013

Rome, Episode 1.03 "An Owl in a Thornbush" (Review)

← Ep. 1.02
Ep. 1.04 →

Pompey: You lack understanding of things military or else you would see that my actions have been perfectly correct at all times.
Cato: You've lost Rome without unsheating your sword. YOU HAVE LOST ROME!
Caesar approaches Rome, and Pompey and his men start to get scared. Pullo and Vorenus are sent ahead towards Rome, while Atia and her family are suffering the repercussions from Pompey's people.

Lucius Vorenus' personal story is really boring, fortunately there is Titus Pullo to ease the situation! It's wonderful when he gives advice about women! :) The two of them are becoming friends, they speak about death, about women, about the stars, about heaven, about philosophy...
Azia is extremely wonderful, more and more! When her house is about to be invaded by Pompey's people,she gives instructions to her servant in a tone as if she's doing a shopping list: I will kill Octavia and Merula tends to me, but if she cannot, and I am taken alive, then you must kill me.
Apart from that on the political front it happens that Pompey flees from Rome, and at the end of the episode
Last thing, Octavian and Cicero are not much present in this episode, so obviously I'm sorry. In particular about the future emperor, who while not uttering than a few sentences still shows his usual political sagacity: I missed him because recently thanks to an exhibition I went to I approached this historical figure I suffer more and more his charm!
The title of this episode intrigued me, but honestly I have not got it right!


Quotes



Mark Antony: He [Vorenus] thinks we've committed a terrible crime, a mighty sacrilege, and shall be severely punished by the Gods.
Julius Caesar: He may be right.
Mark Antony: It's a crime if we lose. If we win, it isn't.

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